Eddie Hoskins - Hoskins Realty, Inc | 508-317-6045 | ed@hoskinsrealty.com


Posted by Eddie Hoskins on 9/7/2020

The lifetime warranty. We’ve all heard about the wonders of owning an item with a lifetime warranty, but few of us actually own such products. Well, few of us are aware of it anyway.

The home is where we pour most of our money into. It seems like things are constantly breaking and needing to be replaced or repaired. But few of us check to see if the item has a manufacturer’s warranty. Nor do we remember if we bought an extended warranty.

In this article, we’re going to give you some tips on how to take advantage of warranties you may not know that you have, and how to shop wisely for warrantied products in the future.

But first, we’ll impart some general warranty knowledge.

Understanding the warranty

A warranty is a written guarantee provided to the purchaser of an item that they will repair or replace the item if it isn’t functioning as intended.

In most cases, there are time limits and exceptions to a warranty. Manufacturers know that their products won’t really last forever, so they plan for the eventual breakdown of the product from wear and tear.

Similarly, manufacturers don’t want you to misuse the product and then ask for a replacement, so they list exceptions to their warranties. To find out if one of your household items is under warranty, you can often check the manufacturer’s website.

To ensure you’re eligible for a warranty or replacement, it’s often necessary to have a copy of your purchase receipt which shows where and when you bought the item.

We know--keeping track of receipts is an annoyance few of us want to participate in. So, an easier solution is to keep an app like Google Drive or Dropbox on your phone with a folder called “receipts” or “warranties.” Then, the next time you make a purchase, simply snap a photo of the receipt and keep in in your drive.

Extended warranty warning

Many retailers will pitch you an extended warranty when you buy a product. Some of them are worth it, but most of the time you’re better off foregoing these add-ons.

Oftentimes, products are already covered by a manufacturer warranty. And, in some cases, the cost of the item is so low that owning a protection plan isn’t worthwhile.

Warrantied items you may not know about

Now that you know how to keep track of your warranties, let’s talk about some important items that you may not know has a warranty.

  • Roofing. Roofs are expensive and don’t last forever. However, many manufacturers promise 20 years of good service from your shingles.

  • Vinyl siding. Another expensive exterior item, siding is often warrantied by common manufacturers, including several “limited lifetime warranties.”

  • Tupperware. If there’s one product on this list you’ve probably heard of, it’s Tupperware. They’ve been famous for their lifetime warranties for decades.

  • Pampered Chef. This company makes an array of kitchen related products. Many of their items come with lifetime warranties.

  • Craftsman. Their power tools are affordable and include a lifetime warranty.




Tags: household   warranty  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Eddie Hoskins on 1/29/2018

Household recycling has become easier than ever. Many towns and cities offer free recycling pickup, and even private waste management companies are implementing recycling programs.

There are a number of advantages to recycling. It helps protect the environment by reducing the amount of waste and making it easier to reuse raw materials. But, recycling is also advantageous to homeowners who don’t want to pay hefty fees for trash pickup when they can often recycle for free.

One of the more difficult aspects of household recycling is the learning curve of actually learning what is and isn’t recyclable. Homeowners might think something is recyclable because it’s made from plastic, only to find out later that it’s a specific type of plastic that can’t be recycled. On the other hand, you might be throwing some items in the garbage, filling up your bin each week when you could be recycling it instead.

In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the lesser known items you could be recycling. We’ll also cover some items you shouldn’t throw in your recycling bin, and give you tips on how to tell which is which.

Things that shouldn’t find their way into your recycling bin

It’s easy to assume that just because something looks like paper, plastic, or glass, that it can be tossed into your recycling bin. However, that isn’t always the case. Look out for these items that may not be recyclable in your area.

  • Used paper food containers. Pizza boxes are one of the biggest culprits that end up in recycling bins when they shouldn’t be. Items like paper food containers, use paper towels, and paper plates are all soiled with grease and other food residue making them ineligible for recycling.

  • Those glossy drink cartons made from unknown materials. There’s a good chance that if you can’t find a recycling logo on it somewhere it can’t be recycled. However, a growing number of cities are accepting milk cartons, so be sure to check on the rules in your area.

  • Plastic shopping bags. Those flimsy bags that you get from the supermarket? You can’t recycle those. As a result, many cities and stores are encouraging the use of reusable shopping bags. If you forget your bags at home, however, fear not: many supermarkets now accept your used plastic bags to be recirculated.

So that eliminates a lot of common household waste from being recycled. However, there are plenty of items you might not be aware of that can be tossed into the recycling bin.

Lesser known recyclable items around the house

Even if something isn’t eligible for curbside recycling doesn’t mean you should just toss it into the trash. There are many items that you can drop off or donate. Here are just a few items that are likely sitting in your house right now:

  • Old cell phones and electronics. Our gadgets are becoming obsolete at an ever-increasing rate. That means many of us have a lot of old tech junk sitting in boxes in our basements. The good news is that several stores accept free drop-offs of old electronics for reuse and recycling.

  • Mattresses and furniture. Large items like mattresses and old furniture are a pain to get rid of. They’re also likely useful to someone out there. For mattresses and box springs, try contacting retailers to see if they reuse them for materials. Furniture that is still in usable condition can be placed on Craigslist or donated to a thrift store like Goodwill or Salvation Army.

  • Oil and ink. Run out of ink in your printer? Online retailers will often pay you for your old cartridges. Also, if you recently changed your oil, drop it off at an auto parts store to be recycling into other automotive materials.




Tags: recycle   household   recycling  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Eddie Hoskins on 1/15/2018

Most of us toss things into the trash without considering where it goes after. The fact that items end up in rivers, water supplies, the ocean, and landfills escapes us because throwing something into the trash is such a seemingly simple act. However, many common items throughout your home are considered household hazardous waste. The EPA defines household hazardous waste as products that can "catch fire, react, or explode under certain circumstances, or that are corrosive or toxic." The EPA, state and local government regulate the use, storage, and disposal of such materials. Improper disposal includes pouring them into the ground or down a drain, as well as throwing them out with the garbage. Learning which products you need to dispose of properly will help you and the environment. Read on to learn which products you might not realize shouldn't be thrown out with the trash, and how to properly dispose of those items.

Where do I dispose of __________?

  • Batteries  Anything in your home that is battery-powered is considered household hazardous waste. Batteries contain strong, corrosive acids that can harm us and the environment alike. There are many different types of batteries and disposal methods vary accordingly. Contact your local hazardous waste disposal site or bring small alkaline batteries to a recycling center than some stores have.
  • CFL light bulbs CFLs contain mercury and are therefore considered household hazardous waste. You can bring them to your local hazardous waste disposal site or bring them to a store that recycles CFL bulbs, such as The Home Depot. Just call first to make sure your local store participates.
  • Medication, needles, and lancets Many medications can be disposed of in the trash. However, prescriptions should be brought to a take-back facility. Check with your local law enforcement for a time and place to bring expired or unused medications. For sharps like needles and lancets, put them in a sharps container and ask your doctor about local disposal areas.
  • Pesticides and herbicides These chemicals can be dangerous to local plant and wildlife. They can also be flammable and should be disposed of at your local hazardous waste disposal site.
  • Ink cartridges Many stores will collect your used up ink cartridges and give you a discount on your next purchase. Other companies offer rebates for mailing in empty cartridges. Try your local Staples first.
  • Automotive liquids Fuel, oil, antifreeze, and other automotive liquids are all considered hazardous. Many auto parts stores accept used oil and other automotive liquids, or you can bring these items to your hazardous waste disposal site.
  • Household cleaners  Cleaning supplies like ammonia and drain cleaner contain harsh chemicals that may be considered hazardous in your area. If you can't use up the products, you could consider donating them to a local store or organization who could. Otherwise, check with your local hazardous waste disposal center to determine the best option.
  • E-waste (electronics waste) E-waste is growing more and more common with advancing technologies that are becoming outdated faster and faster. Many state and local governments regulate e-waste. Some stores, like Staples or Best Buy, accept electronics and electronic appliances for recycling but you should call before dropping your items off. Another option is to donate your working electronics to a place like Goodwill, Savers, or The Salvation Army.







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